Top 10 Medical Issues for Baby Boomers

Top 10 Medical Issues for Baby Boomers

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By Ryan Waterfield

Baby Boomers are a powerful demographic group

About 76 million people were born during the baby boom years—1946-1964. As more Baby Boomers are leaving the work force and enrolling in Medicare for their insurance needs; healthcare providers are focusing on the most common health concerns this generation is facing. Here’s the lowdown:

Certainly, the risk of chronic illness increases with age, but there are behavioral factors that can mitigate many of these issues. A healthy diet, physical activity, and avoiding tobacco use are three key factors in reducing the risk of chronic diseases associated with aging.

Many of these illnesses require a plethora of medications. Simplefill’s Prescription Assistance programs can help you get the right medications for the right price. There’s no need to overspend on your medications. Simplefill will make the process easy, advocate on your behalf, and give you peace of mind.

The more aware you are of the potential health risks that you face as you age (and their potential costs), the more proactive you can be about preventative care and seeking medical attention when you show signs or symptoms. So, here’s to knowing what might ail you.

1.TYPE 2 DIABETES: In a 2011 study by Centers for Disease Control (CDC) showed that people ages 65-74 were diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes 13 times more often than people 45 years or younger. Because Diabetes increases the risk of other serious health problems, it is of significant concern. Other problems include: high blood pressure, vision loss, nerve damage, foot problems, kidney disease, and cardiovascular disease.

2. HEART DISEASE: is the leading cause of death for both men and women over the age of 60. Coronary artery disease (when the arteries that deliver the blood to the heart are narrowed or blocked) is the most common type of heart disease. How do you avoid heart disease? Avoid tobacco, control your blood pressure and cholesterol, exercise and eat a low-fat, low-sodium diet. Maintaining a healthy body weight is also important.

3. CANCER: Once you hit a certain age, it seems like some type of cancer is affecting someone you know or love. And no wonder, it is the second-leading cause of death for people over 65. Cancer screenings and early detection can save lives so don’t avoid tests like colonoscopies and mammograms.

4.DEPRESSION: More than 6.5 million Americans 65 or over are affected by depression. While depression is not a typical process of aging, there are many realities about getting older that can lead to depression: changes in work status, changes in family dynamics, health concerns/struggles etc. It is important to know that it is not a sign of weakness to seek help for depression and baby boomers are a generation less likely to admit to feeling depressed than many of the generations that follow. If you are feeling down, lethargic, sad, talk to your doctors, they can help you get the treatments you need.

5.ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: The sixth-leading cause of death in the U.S., Alzheimer’s is most common in people over 65, but people can experience symptoms in their 40s or 50s. Recent studies have shown that there is a connection between the general health of the heart and blood vessels and the health of the brain. Avoid tobacco, eat a healthy diet, and stay physically active.

6.ARTHRITIS & JOINT PAIN:  Much of the joint pain that people over 60 experience is due to the breakdown of cartilage in the joints. When the cartilage breaks down, bones rub on bones and that causes swelling, pain, and stiffness called osteoarthritis. Maintaining a healthy weight decreases the stress on joints and physical actively like walking, yoga, swimming can keep joints flexible.

7. CAREGIVER STRESS: As partners take ill with chronic diseases like cancer, Alzheimer’s, and other diseases, the spouse becomes the caretaker. Baby Boomers are also sometimes caring for their aging parents and can be susceptible to caregiver stress in that relationship. Being a caregiver will often redefine the roles in a marriage or long-time family relationship. Those suffering from chronic and incurable illnesses will see a significant change in quality of life that is recognized and often treated as part of the overall medical treatment plan for the illness; but the quality of life of caregivers also drastically changes and they are often isolated in their ability to talk about the changes. It is important for caretakers to care for themselves as well, seek treatment if depression develops, and seek a community of others dealing with the same caregiving issues.

8. EYE ISSUES:  In our 40s, many people recognize that they need a little help seeing the words on the page and they find their way to the readers in the pharmacy. But by the time you hit 65 or older, the eye problems can be much more severe. Cataracts (a clouding of the lens of the eye) affect nearly 20.5 million Americans age 40 and over and the likelihood of developing cataracts increases significantly over 60 years of age. By the age of 80, over half of all Americans are dealing with cataracts. The science and surgical techniques have improved the surgeries to make them more efficient (less time in surgery) with quicker recovery times. All of that equals more successful surgeries. Macular degeneration (a progressive disease of the eye) is the leading cause of blindness for people over 55. Annual eye exams help catch vision issues before they get too bad. With treatment, the progression of macular degeneration can be halted or slowed.

9. OBESITY: Americans in particular struggle with obesity. Diet, exercise, sleep, and healthy lifestyle choices (limiting alcohol, limiting the amount of screen time) can help people lose weight, but it takes commitment and educating oneself on risks and consequences of dietary and lifestyle choices. Doctors like to begin intervention in patients who are overweight, not yet obese. One is considered “overweight” with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 29.9; intervention at this stage can help prevent the development of obesity and reduce risk factors for many chronic diseases, such as diabetes, heart attack, stroke, sleep apnea, etc. A person with a BMI of 30 or greater is considered obese.

10. HEPATITIS C:  Baby boomers born between 1945 through 1965 are five times more likely than other adults to be infected with this virus. People infected with Hepatitis C may not even be aware they have it. Hep C can cause liver damage, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and even death. If you test positive for the virus, there are treatments that can cure you.

People who are at risk of getting or having hepatitis C and who should be tested include:

  • Those who currently share or have shared needles in the past.
  • Anyone who received a blood transfusion, blood product, or donor organ prior to the availability of screening in the United States in 1992.
  • People who are on kidney dialysis.
  • Anyone who received tattoos or body piercings with non-sterile instruments.
  • People infected with HIV.
  • Anyone who was ever in jail or prison.
  • Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C.
  • Anyone who received a blood product for clotting problems made before 1987.
  • Healthcare workers who have been accidentally stuck with a contaminated needle


Most of these illnesses require a number of expensive prescription medications and treatment. Simplefill is a full-service prescription assistance company dedicated to helping our members get their medicines at affordable prices. Call Simplefill today to speak with one of their friendly representatives who can discuss your situation in detail and guide you through all of your options.


Call Simplefill at 1.877.386.0206 or go to to start the application process online.


Lung Cancer Awareness

Lung Cancer Awareness


We spoke with our friends at the Mesothelioma and Asbestos Awareness Center  to get a better understanding and learn about preventative measures; we will discuss these illnesses and their causes as follows:

As the leaves begin to change color and the temperatures cool down, we reflect on lung cancer and respiratory illness in the month of November. Every year, lung cancer accounts for the most deaths of any cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in men. While lung cancer affects hundreds of thousands of people every year, many other respiratory diseases and illnesses cause health concerns and deaths annually. Conditions such as asthma, COPD and mesothelioma can be found prevalently throughout the United States. To get a better understanding and learn about preventative measures we will discuss these illnesses and their causes as follows:

Lung Cancer

While smoking is the most notorious cause of lung cancer, many different environmental and lifestyle factors can affect the development of cancer cells in the lungs. The incidence of lung cancer is decreasing in America, partly due to anti-smoking campaigns, but the disease is still prevalent enough to account for 27% of all cancer deaths. Secondhand smoke also remains a very serious health risk, so it is imperative to be aware of your surroundings and never expose children to tobacco smoke. After smoking, radon exposure is the second largest cause of lung cancer, as the EPA estimates that the naturally-occurring gas causes 20,000 new diagnoses annually. The CDC urges smoking cessation and radon detection in the home as two effective means of combating lung cancer incidence. Treatment of lung cancer is an extensive, multi-faceted operation, usually including a regimen of chemotherapy and radiation, as well as surgical removal of affected areas.


Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, known as COPD, as an umbrella term used to define several different respiratory illnesses. The most common of these illnesses are emphysema and chronic bronchitic. Similar to lung cancer, smoking is a leading cause of COPD. However, poor air quality and environmental pollutants can also be factors in a COPD diagnosis. People who work with chemicals, who are exposed to fumes such as diesel exhaust, and those who work in construction generally have a higher risk of being at risk for developing COPD-causing particulate matter. According to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, COPD is characterized by the loss of elasticity in lung components, which makes breathing become more difficult. The disease starts slowly and is progressive, becoming a major disability as it worsens. There is no cure known for COPD, but bronchodilators and steroid therapies have shown some promise in treatment. Most people with COPD diagnoses are middle-aged.


Mesothelioma is rare, hyper-aggressive cancer caused by the exposure to asbestos. Asbestos is a naturally-occurring mineral, which was used extensively in building and construction practices, up until the late-20th Century. However, those who worked closely with the substance began coming down with serious illness, which would develop decades after their initial exposure. This disease, mesothelioma, is caused when asbestos is disrupted – which causes the material to splinter and break into particulate matter. This particulate matter is then inhaled, and it becomes lodged in the lining of the organs; the most common area being the lining around the lungs. During the cancer’s latency period, cells will begin to grow uncontrollably, causing irritation and potentially tumors. Once mesothelioma is diagnosed, the patients generally have a bleak outlook; average mesothelioma life expectancy is only 12-21 months. There is no cure for mesothelioma, but treatment options can help with quality of life and life expectancy. Chemotherapy, radiation, and surgical removal are generally used in conjunction to treat the disease. However, immunotherapy has shown some promise of late – especially the drug Keytruda – in treating mesothelioma patients.


Often overlooked due to its prognosis and commonality, asthma still remains a serious respiratory illness. Asthma is defined as a chronic lung disease in which the body’s airways are inflamed and become narrow, making breathing difficult. The National Institute of Health estimates that asthma affects for than 25 million people nationally, 7 million of which are children. The condition’s onset occurs most commonly during childhood, but many adults are also diagnosed. It is noteworthy that asthma has several forms, including work-induced (from irritants such as chemicals) and allergy-induced (usually caused by seasonal histamines, like pollen and ragweed). Asthma can be very severe when untreated, especially when an individual suffers an asthma attack; these attacks can prove fatal if not treated immediately. Asthma is generally treated with anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids like Prednisone in severe cases, and bronchodilators such as Advair or Symbicort.

How to Promote Healthy Lungs

Respiratory health awareness is imperative for a healthy life. The most effective way to reduce one’s chances of lung illness is to stop smoking immediately. Safety in the workplace, particularly within the construction and manufacturing industries, including the usage of proper equipment, can help to stop your risk of exposure of toxins. Regular exercise and healthy habits can ensure your respiratory health and keep you well for years to come.